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Month: October 2015

Creative Spaces I: RoboFun

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It’s my second week in NY and as part of my plan for the trip was to visit organizations that are doing interesting things in the education field, I’ve been to two amazing places so far and I’ll be writing about these amazing spaces in the Creative Spaces in NYC series.

Last week, I went to RoboFun that offers fun classes on robotics and programming for the kids. Here are some observations/questions/thoughts/wondering I had from my visit: Read more

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Processing information in class

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Education has always been thought of as the flow of knowledge and information from teachers to students. Most people still believe this. Few years back, when we pivoted to  education,  Pete Pattission gave us a demonstration of a re-defined concept of education.

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The tradition model of education

He came up with three glasses: one filled with water and two empty. He started with the model of education that we were used to. Take two glasses one empty and one full. Full glass is a teacher with knowledge filled in it and the empty one is a student desperate to be blessed with knowledge. During teaching process, knowledge flows from the full teacher glass to the empty student one. The student glass is still and steady. When knowledge  is poured from the teacher glass all of it gets into the student glass. But look at the reality of the classroom, students are not still, they keep on playing with their mind and they will miss important piece of knowledge. Same thing happened when he moved the student glass while he was pouring water from the teacher glass, more than half of the water gets to ground. Read more

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Engage and Learn

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11701123_880592845362047_7708574511089035548_nThe children enjoyed playing with the vehicle models they had built themselves. The bright faces of the students reflected their confidence with the subject matter. With enthusiasm and excitement, the room was bursting with energy. But it didn’t start out the same way. Just an hour earlier, these same children had been staring at the string and pencil, figuring out how the combination worked in making circles. The freedom for exploration and the absence of instructions meant most of them had to work through a number of failures. Some get it right the first time while others take their time in making things work. This is a normal energy flow sequence during an experiential class at schools.

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