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11701123_880592845362047_7708574511089035548_nThe children enjoyed playing with the vehicle models they had built themselves. The bright faces of the students reflected their confidence with the subject matter. With enthusiasm and excitement, the room was bursting with energy. But it didn’t start out the same way. Just an hour earlier, these same children had been staring at the string and pencil, figuring out how the combination worked in making circles. The freedom for exploration and the absence of instructions meant most of them had to work through a number of failures. Some get it right the first time while others take their time in making things work. This is a normal energy flow sequence during an experiential class at schools.

1610893_805084952912837_287086401341238309_nOur experiential classes are designed to engage students in activities that require them to work in groups, explore and share among their peers. It is usually a 45 minutes to an hour long session, where the students indulge in discussions and play with the resource we provide. While learning and playing are perceived as two incompatible actions normally, these classes blend the two together to create a fun learning experience for the students. The students make use of their knowledge of Science, Maths, Arts etc. in making projects that show their understanding of the concepts.

 

11046640_805084989579500_696683954909604947_nThese projects that they work on during the hour long session are often crude. Regardless of the final outcome, the struggle and effort that they put in to understand the concept makes their learning worthwhile. But I have personally seen it create a spark in students to explore further on the subject matter. Coming back to the classroom experience, the students love to be in our experiential classes. Often at the end of a class, I’d be barged by an army of students inquiring about the next class.

 

 

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